Here's a humble look into the world of working culture in the creative world... It's not perfect, but it's human.

Views are my own and published every week - mid week-ish, with far too many commas and of course some language... just because.

On another note... I'm taking a few weeks off here as June is the mother of all that is busy. I'll be back, up and running in no time.


The (way-to-many) Rules of Disengagement

As an organization grows, as does the rulebook. I get why this happens, even though I don’t agree with it. It doesn’t make sense to me. Why would less rules and policies for say ten employees be good, but not for fifty? I’m not sure what it is, but I know it’s not a good thing...

Is it because we stop managing?

Can’t be. I mean if you’re managing people properly through consistent communication and hiring through a strong values and brand filter there shouldn’t be an issue.

Is it because that’s just what organizations are supposed to do?

Naw, that’s weird. If it’s working, then it’s working. Of course there are some areas we have to tighten up as we grow, but if you thought it was challenging to manage more people before - nevermind the tomes of policy that now have to be managed.

Is it because employees get more irresponsible when there’s more of them?

Well maybe, but if that’s the case that’s your fault. Again, hiring for the right brand and culture fit should mitigate that. It’s ridiculous to think that just because you have more great people, that all of a sudden you need more rules.

The first rule of the rulebook?

Rules do matter. There’s safety issues, human resource items to address etc. but an over reliance on rules and policies is a direct result of trying to fix problems for your bottom 5%. Those few that aren’t performing as they should. The problem there is that you’ve placed shackles on the high-performing 95%... and they don’t like it.’

The first rule of the rulebook?

When the rules and policies become the drivers for performance rather than problem solving… then the rulebook becomes a great replacement for common sense.